The safety's off

but the gun has no trigger

breelifts:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part I)

The St Louis County Council wasn’t as bad as Ferguson’s Council, but still very few answers and virtually no accountability from the folks who unleashed unholy hell on the residents of Ferguson, following Brown’s murder. #staywoke #farfromover

KEEP POSTING I NEED TO KNOW! DONT STOP POSTING ABOUT THIS. IT IS NOT OVER!

(via zohbugg)

medievalpoc:

peashooter85:

The Jews of Ancient China —- The Kaifeng Jews

The destruction of Jerusalem at the hands of the Romans in 70 AD would create a wave of Jewish diaspora as Jewish rebels were sold into slavery or exiled to locations all over the Roman Empire.  However the spread of Jewish peoples would expand beyond the borders of the Roman world, as Jewish genes can be found all over Europe, Africa, and Asia.  One far flung Jewish community can be found in China, one of the most extreme examples of Jewish immigration in the ancient world.

After the Jewish revolt against Rome many thousands of Jews headed east to enjoy the wealth and riches of the Silk Road to Asia.  Jewish merchant communities sprang up all over Persia, Afghanistan, and Northern India.  One Jewish group traveled as far as Henan Province (Eastern China) and settled in the cosmopolitan city of Kaifeng between 600 – 900 AD.  By the year 1100 the Jews of Kaifeng had established a large and healthy community with a synagogue, communal kitchen, kosher slaughterhouse, ritual bath, and Sukkah (special building used to celebrate the festival of Sukkot).  During the Ming Dynasty the Kaifeng Jews took Chinese surnames which corresponded with the meanings of their original Jewish names.  One Kaifeng Jew, Zhao Yingcheng (Moshe Ben Abram) made his mark in Chinese history by being named the Director of the Ministry of Justice by the Emperor in the mid 1600’s. The religious traditions of the Kaifeng Jews remained the same through most of their history, corresponding exactly to the religious practices of Jews in the west.  However, in the 1860’s the community would be uprooted due to the chaos caused by the Taiping Rebellion.  The synagogue was destroyed and much of the ancient practices of the Kaifeng Jews were lost or forgotten.  The war caused a mini-diaspora of Chinese Jews as they sought refuge all over China.  After the war many Jews returned to Kaifeng to rebuild their community.  Today the Kaifeng Jews still maintain a small community with a rebuilt synagogue.  Today 1,000 Jews still maintain a prosperous community in Kaifeng.

Further Reading:

The Jews of Kaifeng, China: History, Culture, and Religion By Xin Xu

The Haggadah of the Kaifeng Jews of China By Fook-Kong Wong, Dalia Yasharpour

Legends of the Chinese Jews of Kaifeng By Xin Xu

The Kaifeng Stone Inscriptions: The Legacy of the Jewish Community in China By Tiberiu Weisz

The Jews of China: Historical and Comparative Perspectives edited by Jonathan Goldstein

(Source: sino-judaic.org, via gadaboutgreen)

People often say ‘stop being angry and educate us’, not understanding that the anger is part of the education.

(via amydentata)

And note that folks dont ever take the time to educate themselves. A 2 second Google search would solve problems but folks would rather whine about how mean the marginalized group is being to them…

(via sourcedumal)

(via chescaleigh)

Indeed, the idea of ‘winning the girl’ – of overcoming female objections or resistance through repeated and frequently escalating efforts – is central to most of our modern romantic narratives. (Female persistence, by contrast, is viewed as pathetic.) And the more I think about instances of creepiness, harassment and stalking that culminate in either the threat or actuality of sexual assault, the more I’m convinced that a massive part of the problem is this socially sanctioned idea that men are fundamentally entitled to persist. Because if men are meant to persist, then women who say no must only be rejecting the attempt, not the man himself, so that every separate attempt becomes one of a potentially infinite number of keys which might just fit the lock of the woman’s approval. She’s not the one who’s allowed to say no, not really; she should be silent and passive as a locked door, waiting patiently while the man runs through however many keys he can be bothered trying. And if he gets sick of this lengthy process and just breaks in? Well, frustration under those circumstances is only natural. Either the door shouldn’t have been there to impede him, or it shouldn’t have been locked.

The Creepiness Question (via notemily)
Its an extended rape fantasy narrative, is what it is. (via bad-dominicana)

(via kissmehereandhere)

NYPD Cops Arrest Mom Who Was Waiting For Family To Return From Restroom [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrism, White Privilege]

prettyboyshyflizzy:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Chaumtoli Huq was standing alone outside a Ruby Tuesday’s in Times Square in July when New York City police officers told her to move. She says she wasn’t in anyone’s way, she wasn’t blocking the sidewalk — she was just waiting for her husband and two young children, 6 and 10, to come outside after using the restroom. 

That’s when the cops arrested her.

DNAinfo, which first reported on the arrest, says Huq “said the officers pinned her against the wall, prompting her to say, ‘I can’t move, I can’t move.’”

Huq told The New Civil Rights Movement in an email conversation that police pushed her “against the wall of Ruby Tuesday, and I screamed ‘Help,’” as this image, taken by a bystander, shows.

arrest_yell_2.jpg

She says when the police arrested her they pulled her arm up, causing pain and scars. Another officer, Huq says, was squeezing her arm “so I had to walk bent over,” as this photo, taken by the same bystander, shows.

arrest1.jpg

"My shoe was gone. All in public as folks watched." It was "humiliating," Huq adds.

As it turns out, Chaumtoli Huq is a human rights attorney. She says she is on leave from her position as general counsel for NYC Public Advocate Letitia James. And she says she’s suing.

"When I was arrested," Huq tells The New Civil Rights Movement, "I was with my family, and we had left a rally for children in Palestine who were being injured, killed because of the conflict, and [were] heading to a picnic in Brooklyn."

"At that moment, I was a mom, a loving partner to my husband of 12 years, but I became in a second the arresting officer’s ‘prisoner.’ He said to me when he was searching my purse and took my identification and when I objected, that I was his prisoner and he could do whatever he wanted."

The New York Daily News reports that when Huq “said she was in pain, one of the officers, Ryan Lathrop, allegedly told her, ‘Shut your mouth.’ When he found out she had a different last name than her hubby, he told her ‘In America, wives take the names of their husbands.’”

She was held for nine hours after the officers falsely claimed she had refused instructions to move and had “flailed her arms and twisted her body” to make it hard for them to handcuff her, the suit says.

chaumtoli_huq.jpg

Huq, who is 42, says she is currently “on a fellowship to investigate labor conditions in Bangladesh after the collapse of Rana Plaza.” She says, “I think that as a mom [that] I can be reduced and humiliated and separated from my family is what impacts me most to this day. My son asked me: ‘Why did the officer arrest you?’”

Raising a boy of color, and knowing how youth of color are vulnerable to over-policing, made me think, this is not about me but about my life’s work of protecting New Yorkers.

If at this moment, I didn’t step up and advocate for their rights, then, how can I authentically call myself an advocate for New Yorker.

As for the lawsuit, Huq says, “I am demanding in my suit and through community groups: (1) the officer to be removed; (2) training for NYPD on Muslim and South Asia community as well as gender: (3) change in city policy on over-policing in communities of color; (4) resources for youth of color who are most vulnerable to over-policing and whose life chances are most impacted by a criminal record.”

Source: David Badash for The New Civil Rights Movement

so when them body cameras coming in…

(via beautiful-ambition)